How can we improve the Lower Eyre Peninsula Bushfire Management Area Plan?

Now Closed

This online engagement was hosted on YourSAy from 14 October to 25 November 2019. Find out more about the consultation process. Below is a record of the engagement.

 

The Lower Eyre Peninsula BMAP comprises three parts:

  1. A pdf document Draft Bushfire Management Area Plan - outlining the planning process, content and other relevant information
  2. An interactive web-based map that identifies assets and their risk levels, and includes pop-up tables of information for each asset
  3. A spreadsheet Asset Treatment List containing a list of all BMAP assets, their risk rating and activities to help mitigate the risks.

View the draft plan and tell us what you think in the discussion below.

Comments closed

Corinne Ang

22 Nov 2019

If the local government is serious about reducing severity, intensity and duration of bushfires, then the “root cause” needs to be addressed. And this is climate change due to rising carbon emissions.
Serious reforestation needs to be implemented, but not only that, pressure on the federal government to shift our heavy carbon-emitting economy to a clean green one. Otherwise, all your bushfire strategies and added implementations will be for naught.

Andrea Louise

22 Nov 2019

Do everything we can to address the causes of our changed climate.

"The Bureau of Meteorology and the CSIRO say Australia has warmed by 1C since 1910 and temperatures will increase in the future.

Higher temperatures accelerate evaporation. They also extend the growing season for vegetation in many regions, leading to greater transpiration (the process by which water is drawn from the soil and evaporated from plant leaves and flowers). The result is that soils, vegetation and the air may be drier than they would have been with the same amount of rainfall in the past."

This is the link between climate change and the unprecedented bushfires Australians are now facing.

We need to help those affected by the danger of fires (pretty much all of us now) by talking about the causes.

https://www.theguardian.com/australia-news/2019/nov/11/what-are-the-links-between-climate-change-and-bushfires-explainer?CMP=soc_567

Glen Davis

12 Nov 2019

3mtr fire strips bordering propertys to be 5mtrs and to be kept low all yr around not just to be enforced in december ,thats too late .more burnoffs around town ship but not on windy northerlies .vegetation strips on edge of roads to be cleared at intervals to stop feeding fire alongside rds .water planes of decent water carrying potential to be rostered near port lincoln during fire season critical months .more property inspections of fire readiness to be more a matter of course .

Glen Davis > Glen Davis

12 Nov 2019

I forgot to mention to speak and listen ,use local indeginious people experience in burns

Linda Sperring

31 Oct 2019

There doesn't seem to be very much interest taken in the native flora and fauna in the area. Why are you not working with traditional cool fire burners to minimise the impact on our native species?

Government Agency

CFS Bushfire Management Planning Unit > Linda Sperring

31 Oct 2019

Hi Linda,
Thank you for interest in the LEP Bushfire Management Plan. Have you seen the map on the online portal that shows all the environmental assets that have been risk assessed? If you click on the third tab on the left hand side of the online map you will see a map displaying six categories of environmental assets: Native flora, Native fauna, Reserve Systems, Significant Habitat and Threatened Ecological Communities. Strategies to mitigate the risk to these assets from bushfire have been assigned where appropriate; prescribed burning being one tool that would be considered where feasible and appropriate.

Sarah Macdonald

23 Oct 2019

I am completely opposed the the previous comment posted 16/10/19. In this era of climate change and knowledge I find it disturbing that anyone thinks the biggest polluting and highest health risk power sources could be better than sustainable sources.
Having just read, The Biggest Estate on Earth, by Bill Gammage, I feel we need to start experimenting with small area burnings, hot burns, cool burns, frequency of burns... looking at what the local Aboriginal groups are doing now and whether that is getting good results... it wont take much to burn off the most seriously hazardous fire fuel, brush/undergrowth.

Allan Taylor

16 Oct 2019

The bush fire management plan of the Eyre Peninsula would be enhanced by eliminating known FIRE HAZARDS, in particular wind farms/SCAMS. All wind farm development should be stopped. Five major bush fires in Australia are known to have been started by malfunction of wind turbines. Get rid of them. We want our power generated by COAL, GAS, HYDRO or NUCLEAR power stations, NOT from wind mills. Such a move should be obvious to Government authorities.

Fiona Tasslor > Allan Taylor

31 Oct 2019

bush fires were started by either mother nature or pyromaniacs. Coal, gas and nuclear, Why? Digging, fracking, poisoning, all poison the atmosphere. Wind is a natural energy and the turbines enhance power supply the same way solar does.