How do you think we can get South Australians more active, more often?

We want your feedback on how we can help get South Australians more active in their communities to help inform our vision for an Active State.

Let us know what you think by commenting below.

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Jean Spain

11 Dec 2019

We need more dedicated paths for bike riding

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Brian Delaney

11 Dec 2019

Employees to offer incentives for those who cycle or walk to work. This could include a rebate.for bikes used to commute. Also work bike fleets including e bikes. The Government as the biggest employee in the State should be leading by example .

Brian Delaney > Brian Delaney

11 Dec 2019

Should read as employers not employees

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Office for Recreation, Sport and Racing > Brian Delaney

11 Dec 2019

Thanks Brian - great ideas!

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Dan Rutter

10 Dec 2019

Support and promote local associations that have goals to increase participation in movement based disciplines. They’ll naturally build Inclusive communities and keep people moving.

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Office for Recreation, Sport and Racing > Dan Rutter

11 Dec 2019

Thank you, Dan. Are you involved in a local association that has these shared goals? If so, we would be interested to know where.

Dan Rutter > Dan Rutter

11 Dec 2019

Hi ORSR, yes I’m involved with the South Australian Parkour Association. And we very much appreciate your ongoing support. :)

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Jim Binder

09 Dec 2019

Campaigns that help motivation...not using super athletes...or super seniors...everyday people looking to be the best they can be ....eg. if not for yourself - do it for someone you love ! 'I do strength training...so I can give better hugs to my grandkids'.
Continued promotion of Low Level programs that assist with confidence and competence eg. Heart Foundation Walking...Cycle Salisbury Social rides. Better connected trail network...it's coming if not somewhat slowly.
Celebrate success stories.

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Rosemarie Smith

08 Dec 2019

Having experience as a cyclist for many years I feel confident in saying that driver / cyclist education has no where near enough airing for drivers / riders to know the road rules. When was the last time you saw a promotion campaign to enhance awareness ? Safety is a huge issue. We all hear of the near misses and the injuries / fatalities and get the jitters. Many elderly drivers have no idea of the road rules. One dear old girl merged into the cycle lane to give me enough room to pass her on the right. Cyclist have ongoing discussions on how some rules are supposed to be. All in all its quite confusing for many. If people feel safe they will get out there and do it.

My observation of people that could be more active are that often they are low income families. Most activities have a cost factor so you get people that would like to partake in activities but simply have to put the money, to food on the plate. Aim to activities that have little or no cost with the benefit of some free public transport. Promote events that are without costs. Eg: Carols by Candlelight events get masses of people attending, no charges, people united at all ages, social growing / interactive usually with a reasonable walk to participate.

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Pat Bridges

07 Dec 2019

More safe connected cycle infrastructure so people can ride safely to school and work. Even the piecemeal current bike network isn't complete with decade long ongoing delays to construction schedules . Regular car free days (e.g. sundays) in the CBD as per many overseas cities. Reduced speed limits in high pedestrian areas such as the cbd to encourage active transport especially walking and cycling plus scooters and skateboards etc.

Damien Henderson > Pat Bridges

09 Dec 2019

Agree with all the above.
More and safer bike lanes.
There are too many unsafe roads, but to connect you have to use them!
One inexpensive way to make a bike lane safer would be to make the white line a “rumble strip”, I’ve experienced these in Victoria.
SA has so much to offer Cyclists, we should capitalise on this as a Tourist opportunity and it would benefit all. Especially the coffee shops 😀

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Jon Holbrook

06 Dec 2019

South Australians aren't active because we make driving too easy, and other transport options too hard. If the bike network got a larger fraction of the transport funding, and some planning, then it could:
1. Be a real network, where pieces of it joined up (rather than shared paths just stopping in the middle of nowhere, and bike lanes just disappearing)
2. Be separated from motorised traffic. Painted lines are not sufficient to keep people on bikes safe, especially when too many people in cars ignore the minimum passing distance law.
3. Provide a real transport option, for example a bike path next to an arterial road would also be an arterial transport option, with traffic on cross roads required to give way to bikes (rather than the other way around)

There are some fabulous bikeways in Adelaide (the Outer Harbor Greenway and the Mike Turtur Bikeway being two) but they are not complete. The OHG gets to the Parklands, and then stops. How does one get into the city (and work) without competing with cars and buses on city streets? The Mike Turtur Bikeway needs a little detour because there is no bridge across the railway line at Goodwood. The Government is spending millions getting rid of level crossings. This is one more level crossing that could increase the amount of active transport in the city.

The bike network also suffers from a lack of focus on nodes such as schools and shopping centres. If I want to get to Seaton High School (for example) by bike from the south, then I can't, without battling Trimmer Pde and Frederick Rd, both of which have no cycling infrastructure at all. Many other schools are the same. West Lakes Mall and Marion shopping centre are designed to be reached by car, full stop.

Make it easier for people to ride, and harder to drive, and activity rates will increase. But political will and some willingness to explain why we can't just keep building road space for cars is required.

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Office for Recreation, Sport and Racing > Jon Holbrook

06 Dec 2019

Thank you, Jon for your suggestions regarding bikeways.

Damien Henderson > Jon Holbrook

09 Dec 2019

An active and publicised, informed commitment from SA Government to make SA a Bike Friendly State, would reap huge social, physical and economic benifits. 🚴

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Mike Bormann

05 Dec 2019

Why do you want South Australians to be more active? (I know it's self-evident, but it's not clearly stated. Is it really to grow the "exercise industry" to help the economy? If your project is successful you will have more people driving in cars get to their chosen "activity" location. I guess that's not a major problem for road congestion because these activities won't be "peak hour". I'm 68. In my teens I played footy and tennis. When I got married I stopped. In my 30s I started jogging - in the Corporate Cup - then I stopped because recovery between runs was an issue. Finally in my late 40s, I dusted off my son's decrepit mountain bike and started riding it along the Little Para Trails to get fit again. But just "going for a ride" isn't always practical. So I started riding to work. To begin with I rode in on the bike and took the train home then the next day I took the train and rode home. Eventually I was able to ride to and from most days. Now that I'm retired, I look to ride my bike whenever I can rather than drive. Not because I want to "get exercise" but because it's efficient and less stressful than driving. It just frustrates me how difficult it is to find safe point to point routes. On road cycle lanes are not safe. I look to find suburban streets away from major roads wherever I can. I hope my grandchildren will be able to enjoy Dutch style cycleways one day. Not just the recreational ones we have at the moment.

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Timothy Lim

05 Dec 2019

Easy. Encourage more South Australians to use Adelaide metro by increasing the frequency of train and bus services on the weekends. Keep the trains safe with police patrol. Keep Adelaide metro reliable and affordable by not privatising then. By using public transport services instead of driving, people will have to walk more and there will be less traffic on the roads too.

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Office for Recreation, Sport and Racing > Timothy Lim

06 Dec 2019

Thanks Timothy

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Jason Offe

02 Dec 2019

People need to feel safe to get out of the couch, and car and participate in leisure exercise and in active transport. There has been a push, in the form of funding, for active transport infrastructure from the state to councils. This has been built in the form of off road bike paths (shared paths). These are great for people who want to ride for leisure , exercise, or active transport and are not willing to risk their lives on the road. When these paths are in the road reserve your safety is covered under the road rules as dogs have to be on lead and this is great. The problem is that these paths travel through the road reserve, into a park, back into the road reserve, through a different park, controlled by a different council, all potentially within a minute. As a rider you will never keep up if your in a lead area or in off lead area. There is no consistent rules on these paths because leash laws are governed by what park you are in or the road rules when you are in the road reserve. When councils talk about active transport they quickly point to how many off road bike paths (shared paths) they have. The problem is they don't see the paths as interconnecting transport corridors, but as a part of the individual park's amenities. West Torrens actually encourages you, on its website, to walk your dog off lead at the "Torrens River Linear Park and similar bike/walking paths"! Charles Sturt Have just had a consultation if they should have dogs on or off lead on the River Torrens Bike Path (shared path). The state government needs to have these paths classified as public places or transport corridors so they are not seen as just a part of the park they run through. As a user of these paths, both as a cyclist and pedestrian walking my dog I don't think you should have to accept that you are from time to time going to be, or your dog is going to be, attacked, chased, harassed or collide with a dog off lead. The danger of off lead dogs is recognised in kids playgrounds and in areas where organised sport is played and there are the rules in place to stop this happening, but some how the danger is not recognised on a bike path?

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Office for Recreation, Sport and Racing > Jason Offe

03 Dec 2019

Thanks Jason, some really great comments and ideas here.

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Jack Singh

29 Nov 2019

To get active communities, you need to create a sense of community and spaces for communities. Spaces with no traffic and communal areas with benches facing each other encouraging people to communicate. Look at the way city benches are set up now - pretty much so people can keep to themselves with individual benches facing away. Some countries already do communities really well - look to them for ideas.

What about exercise stations in the South parklands like the ones in Victoria park. Again - set them up in a circular manner - encourages people to meet.

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Office for Recreation, Sport and Racing > Jack Singh

03 Dec 2019

Hi Jack - great ideas. Thank you.

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Joy Woods

28 Nov 2019

I'm a ex P. E teacher. I found that dancing competition school wide had everyone dancing to the PA system.every lunch time. Interschool sports were more common and there are plenty of over 50s who would be interested in coaching after schol

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Office for Recreation, Sport and Racing > Joy Woods

03 Dec 2019

Thank you for your insights, Joy.

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Ros Brady

28 Nov 2019

Honestly to make the CBD more exercise friendly the footpaths need to be given back to pedestrians. To walk around the CBD is becoming very unsafe. There are scooters rushing up behind you and passing, without warnings. There are bicycles flying past you, most without warning. Escooters are left laying over footpaths causing a hazard. What happens if a pedestrian trips over an Escooter that has been left laying on a footpath which causes an injury. Who is accountable for this? What happens if a cyclist hits a pedestrian? As bikes are not registered how can a pedestrian trace who has hit them? Why do bikes need to use footpaths when we have bike lanes plus why can’t Escooters use bike lanes as well.

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Office for Recreation, Sport and Racing > Ros Brady

03 Dec 2019

Thank you for your comments, Ros.

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Sean O'Mahoney

28 Nov 2019

Don't underestimate the power of advertising.
Every ad break on TV, in newspapers, and all over the internet, the general public is bombarded with ads for cars. Every car brand and many car dealerships invest lots of money into promoting their products, and it works. People are left with the image that cars are the only serious way to get around our cities and towns. Never have I seen an ad from a private company that promotes cycling as something normal people do. I've only seen a few ads targeted at professional cyclists or promoting the Tour Down Under.
I think this has a much larger effect on the population than most people realise, as many people see cycling as 'not for me' and cyclists as a nuisance on the road.
If bicycle manufacturers, like Giant and Apollo, invested in ads which advertised their latest models of bicycles as classy and convenient for the general public to use (much like most car ads), I'm sure in time we could see a cultural change normalising bicycle riding. Bicycle dealerships should also get in the game, advertising their wears for everyday commuting cycling, in tandem with the bicycle manufacturers.
The Government should actively encourage (perhaps by subsidisation) private businesses in the cycling industry to develop effective and on-going advertisement campaigns with the goal of spreading cycling to the masses.

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Office for Recreation, Sport and Racing > Sean O'Mahoney

03 Dec 2019

Thank you, Sean. Very interesting ideas around better advertising the idea of "active transport".

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Dean Philp

28 Nov 2019

Everything people have said here already is fantastic: more trees, more active transport, less sport specialisation, more greenspace. Trends towards more nature play seem to be going well. Perhaps the most pressing concern is changing minds and behaviors away from exercise to activity and movement. Unpacking that enormous subject is too much for here, but we can discuss two points:

1. Role models.
2. Behaviour change.

Role models are important. Humans do what other humans do. Even with great playspaces, kids are probably going to grow up to be just like their parents. Inactive, tired and disconnected from their body. Adults need to set the standard. So perhaps we can find more funding for outdoor playspaces for adults. I don't mean one-dimensional exercise equipment. I mean a landscape of affordances that invite curiosity of movement.

A famous psychologist once said that any behaviour change involves driving forces and constraining forces. Driving forces are like motivation. Constraints are like barriers. People often think it's all about motivation, but motivation is fickle. What counts is removing all the barriers and making the behaviour easy. So with activity and movement I think it's about proximity, opportunity and the curiosity/fun comment from above. For proximity, we will have a hard time building an active state unless there is ample outdoor space at the end of the street. Otherwise, out of sight out of mind. For opportunity, this is where we need to create an environment where the neighborhood has a community feel with moving in that end-of-the-street park every day. How we do we create that? Big subject. But perhaps a start would be funding individual creative movement artists / circus artists etc for holding gold-coin donation classes in all those parks. Here I am thinking of the likes of people from Cirkidz, SA Parkour Association etc.

Books for thought:
Movement Matters: Essays on Movement Science, Movement Ecology, and the Nature of Movement ~ by Katy Bowman.

Hom-o Ludens: A Study of the Play Element in Culture ~ by Johan Huizinga

Thanks for listening. Must be great to help create a more active state. What a difference to the world that will make.

Dean Philp

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Office for Recreation, Sport and Racing > Dean Philp

03 Dec 2019

Some great ideas around the importance of role models and the impact behaviour change can make - thank you, Dean.

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Sarah Rodgers

27 Nov 2019

In Mount Gambier there have been a lot of trees cut down, footpaths built that are extremely harsh on the eyes (even in winter) and there is money being wasted on roads that do not need fixing. If the council spent more money on the upkeep of our larger trees rather than chopping them down and replacing them with twigs that kids enjoy destroying, there would be much more shade and the town would be more walking 'friendly'. For example, the old footpaths are lopsided and have cracks which have caused many injuries over the years and the new footpaths are so harsh on people eyes that they have vision issues (we have white pavers along the main street that reflect the suns glare and our walking trail is bitumen that radiates a lot of heat during the warmer months and also reflects the suns glare in some places).

Another issue for the town is that it doesn't matter which way you walk to the city centre, there is very little shade and on 30-40 degree days you're pretty much guaranteed to get sun burnt.

If the local council really wanted to see our town get more physical they would make it more walking/ running friendly. They would provide adequate shade, water stations and toilet facilities for all ages, genders and ability levels. They would assist people who are wanting to run fitness groups such as hiking and walking or even mother groups who want to get more active. Rather than waste government funding on buildings that have air con, heating and other stuff that's bad for the environment and that most people will not use, they could provide more physical activities out in nature. Councils (not just in Mount Gambier, but everywhere) should embrace the natural environment we have and lead the way when it comes to protecting our environment. There are scrub lands, bush lands, pine forest and mountains, it's time we embrace this and get back out into nature. It doesn't cost anything and it doesn't do the environment any harm (as long as you do the right thing).

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Office for Recreation, Sport and Racing > Sarah Rodgers

03 Dec 2019

Thank you, Sarah for your comments - some great ideas here.

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Tom Morrison

25 Nov 2019

Adelaide's original planning was always done on the basis of 'garden suburbs'. This gave everyone a chance to be active in their own backyard and means that many suburbs closer to the City were not planned to have large numbers of public parks or shared green space. With the increase in residential infill, these backyards are disappearing leaving many areas without any shared green spaces that are within walking distance of the house. This means that many parents would have to take their kids to the park at a younger age and stay around waiting for them to finish playing. I think that local and state governments need to co-ordinate the introduction of more public green space and parks in areas where levels of residential infill are occuring. People who are moving into new master-planned community like Lightsview have the benefits of this already. Green space oriented development for urban infill will not only increase physical activity, but it should also improve a sense of community and belonging. This has been done exceptionally well in Singapore and parts of Europe.

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Office for Recreation, Sport and Racing > Tom Morrison

25 Nov 2019

Thanks Tom. This has been a key theme that has come out of our consultation, and it is great to hear your ideas from Singapore and Europe. Please email us at GameOn@sa.gov.au if you have any specific examples from these overseas areas.

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Stephen Humble

25 Nov 2019

The government need to repeal mandatory bicycle helmet laws. These laws stop people using bicycles.
The withdraw of the last 2 bike hire schemes was at least partly due to low patronage as people don't want to have to wear a shared helmet and also the expense to provide plastic helmets. Long term enforcement effects discourage people from riding with misleading messaging about how dangerous riding as that is required to justify helmet laws and also direct threat of fines and bullying by police and sheer inconvenience of the law.
Annually there are thousands of helmet fines and thousands helmet warnings issued by police in SA about something that should be free choice and is free choice almost everywhere else in the world including China, UK, Germany, India , USA etc.
The Australian cycling participation survey shows bike usage rates continuing to fall - i note the cost of the fine has gone up which could explain that.
There is a correlation between people riding and enforcement of bicycle helmet fines - In those places like NT and WA and ACT where enforcement is low and fines are less more people ride.
Bicycle helmet laws are oppressing bike users and bike usage - all the money spent on exercise campaigns will not work when the state insists on subjecting people to nanny state law, police bullying and a $162 fine.
In spite of the huge amount of money spent on new bike ways and bike lanes how will it encourage biking when the police are actively bullying people who would like to ride on them.
SA should repeal the helmet law at the very least for a trial and let those who ride decide.

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Office for Recreation, Sport and Racing > Stephen Humble

25 Nov 2019

Thank you, Stephen. We appreciate your feedback and your perspective on this issue.

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DARCY LUNN

22 Nov 2019

Active transport infrastructure - cycling and walking. For example separated paths for Willunga → Aldinga → Seaford to set up some more shorter distances for people not ready to cycle all the way to Willunga from the city, plus linking towns together and to public transport. Also bike carriers on busses where the trains don't go. Link nature to public transport and then youth can get there on their own and go for a ride and adventure! The Belair train is a great example of this filled with teenagers on their bikes the weekends...

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Office for Recreation, Sport and Racing > DARCY LUNN

25 Nov 2019

Thanks Darcy, these examples are great.

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Kelly McGorm

19 Nov 2019

Better bicycle infrastructure across town, especially to schools. More regular and available public transport so people walk to and from the stops to their home, School, work etc.

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Office for Recreation, Sport and Racing > Kelly McGorm

25 Nov 2019

Thank you for the feedback, Kelly.

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Office for Recreation, Sport and Racing

19 Nov 2019

Thank you Matthew for your interest in the project and comments.
This issue was raised during our Statewide Consultation (Phase one) and one of the Game On themes we are focusing on is "Active young people with good coordination and strong fundamental movement skills" to ensure our youth are set up for a healthy active future.

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Matthew Cox

19 Nov 2019

Further to my previous. In fact I would say that the current systems in place identify talent, train talent (at too earlier of an age), burn out talent and lose people to their sports more often than not. I believe there is vast majority of wasted talent.

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Matthew Cox

19 Nov 2019

I think we may have it wrong. To some degree I think that kids are in fact forced into doing too much sport from too earlier of an age. I think that growing bodies need to be nurtured. I don't like seeing young kids as early as 8 specialising in certain sports. This is actually all too common. I believe a large degree of talent is being lost across most sports because of too earlier focus on any particular sport. I personally believe that all sports should be done for fun and enjoyment at least until the age of about 15. I believe that societal pressures, peer pressure, fear of missing out, the fact that it 'is the well trodden pathway', and a probable lack of understanding means that kids, parents and coaches think that more is always better. I can assure you that I am living proof that more (certainly at a young age) is not better. Children and kids need to try lots of different sports to find the ones they enjoy most. Specialisation and programs of training need to be limited to ages of 16 so that their young bodies are able to adapt and cope with the training. It's all about balance and rest is as important as any exercise.

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